Are we guilty of looking at pixels not pictures? Last Sunday Stephen Talmadge from Ipswich shared a sketch of a sheep to make this powerful point.

We all too easily get fixated on the detail, missing the bigger picture. God, by contrast, sees everything – from the big picture of the whole universe, right down to the minutiae of what’s in our pockets and our handbags. God sees it all. And He cares about it all. All 7 billion people living here on earth.

If each of us is represented by a dot on a wall, and we place dots at a rate of one per second, it would take 217 years to place every dot. Yet God sees us all, and hears us all – our prayers, our songs, our thoughts. God knows the tiny things about us, even the hairs on our heads.

He lavishes blessings upon us, so we are able to meet to praise Him. Many can not. We have food, shelter and warmth, and can read God’s word, while many in the world do not. We are in a very privileged place.

But Jesus says don’t worry about food or clothing or such worldly things. The ravens have all they need. And so do we. God is in control – right down to the tiniest pixel of detail, and at the full universe scale too – it is all in His control.

If only we could see that big picture more clearly, to realise how richly we are blessed materially, and to realise that our spiritual blessings are immeasurably greater still. As Paul wrote to Timothy: our Father’s grace, given to us in Christ Jesus, and revealed through his appearing as our Saviour, has destroyed death and brought us life and immortality, through the gospel.

Thus inspired we can communicate the good news – with our Brothers and Sisters, and others too. We can share our learning, knowing that knowledge alone is nothing. It is the wisdom it leads us to that counts: the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

In the big picture we all occupy slightly different roles, so tolerance is important. Paul changed his character, as far as east is from west, despite his great knowledge. The big picture, the gospel, requires us to be ready to change, as it guides our lives. We need look nowhere else. But we do need to avoid looking at it like an advertising hoarding three inches from our noses, and step back and see it in its glorious entirety.